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Peter Larson

Type of Work: photography

Peter Larson is a 27 year old photographer based in Cleveland. He attended Ohio University, graduating with a Bachelor in Visual Communication (Commercial Photography). He worked as a photographer and photo editor before starting Peter Larson Photo in June 2010. His Labradoodle’s name is Otto.

After working with Fred Bidwell and analyzing the motifs within the Anisfield-Wolf organization, Larson created a photography installation with human forms symbolizing columns. Placed in the Tower City RTA Station, life size photographs of Clevelanders seem like they are literally holding up the ceiling of the station. These artistic “teamwork” between a group of individuals - young, old, black, white, Hispanic - illustrates the idea of a community working towards a common goal, no matter how great the burden may be.

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Keliy Anderson-Staley

Type of Work: photography

Keliy Anderson-Staley was raised off the grid in Maine, studied photography in New York City and currently lives and teaches photography at the University of Houston in Texas. She holds a BA from Hampshire College in Massachusetts and an MFA in photography from Hunter College in New York. Anderson-Staley’s images are in the permanent collections of the Library of Congress, Cedar Rapids Museum of Art, Portland Museum of Art (Maine), and Museum of Fine Arts-Houston. She was the recipient of a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship, a Puffin Grant, a fellowship from the Howard Foundation, the Carol Crow Fellowship from the Houston Center for Photography and the Clarence John Laughlin Award from the New Orleans Photo Alliance. Her work was published in a solo issue of Light Work’s Contact Sheet and has been shown at the National Portrait Gallery of the Smithsonian, Portland Museum of Art, Akron Art Museum, Bronx Museum of Art, Southeast Museum of Photography and the California Museum of Photography, as well as at a number of galleries around the country. Anderson-Staley has been making wet plate collodion tintypes and ambrotypes for eleven years.

Through diligent direction from Fred Bidwell, Keliy Anderson-Staley created “50 Faces of Cleveland,” a series of tintype portraits showcasing 50 people from around the city. The idea for the project was based around the celebration of diversity exhibited through the the Anisfield Wolf Book Awards. Staley’s installation captures a true essence of Cleveland’s diversity through individual expression and creates a powerful piece that engrains the city’s culture and people.

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Type of Work: paint-and-wood

Bio: Alex Yanes

Born in Miami, Alex Yanes is the product of both the ever-evolving, fast-paced city and the burgeoning art scene. In a city filled with wild characters and over-saturated personalities, Yanes is refreshingly humble, preferring instead to let his vibrant and colorful artwork take center stage.Since he decided to pursue art full-time in 2006, his work has become his autobiography, speaking volumes about who he is and what he has seen. Yanes’ work is the result of years spent immersed in skateboard, tattoo, hip-hop and rock culture during his teenage years, but says he felt the stirrings of creativity at a young age. Each piece is a unique view into Yanes’ history and love of all things art and have caught the eye of art aficionados and corporate collectors alike.

Since he decided to pursue art full-time in 2006, his work has become his autobiography, speaking volumes about who he is and what he has seen. Yanes’ work is the result of years spent immersed in skateboard, tattoo, hip-hop and rock culture during his teenage years, but says he felt the stirrings of creativity at a young age. Each piece is a unique view into Yanes’ history and love of all things art and have caught the eye of art aficionados and corporate collectors alike.And because he supports the city that cultivated him as an artist, he has made it a priority to work with local foundations where he can help children and ultimately bolster their love of art.

And because he supports the city that cultivated him as an artist, he has made it a priority to work with local foundations where he can help children and ultimately bolster their love of art.
Whimsical and yet relatable, Yanes’ art embodies innovative use of color and imaginative subject matter and speaks to collectors and new art lovers, alike.

Like all of us, I have had moments and memories in my past that had to be let go. There are circumstances in life which we cannot control, where dwelling on them simply solves nothing. Moving on and living in the present has been the key to finding true happiness for me. We all have a “history.” We live through it, learn from it, and become stronger.
My piece titled, “Present Tense” is comprised of ‘thoughts’ from the past moving forward, gaining strength and momentum towards true happiness.

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Ryan Jaenke

Type of Work: mural

Ryan Jaenke is a 2016 Creative Workforce Fellow. He was born and raised on the west side of Cleveland where he learned that the city’s culture begins at the neighborhood level. Early encounters with graffiti art, railroad tracks, and alleyways have led to a life-long pursuit of finding inspiration from often overlooked corners of the city. For the past 10 years, Ryan has worked collaboratively with a tight-knit group like-minded artists that have investigated the hidden meaning of Cleveland’s commercial narrative through short films, multimedia installations, and public art. He currently contributes to the short documentary series “Behind the Sign” that highlights the unsung heroes of Cleveland’s small business community. Ryan’s work has been exhibited in Cleveland, Chicago, Miami, and San Francisco.

My mural is based on the poem Montage of a Dream Deferred written by Langston Hughes in 1951. The poem describes life in Harlem and the broken dreams of its inhabitants. Hughes’ work has a rhythm that derives from the jazz music that was popular in the borough at the time. I chose to work in black and white because it has the immediacy of the printed word or a musical score, and the repetition of line and shape builds a visual rhythm. I want the piece to be read as much as it is looked at. The hands represent the struggles and intimacy of people confined to a place that has been overlooked by the opportunity and prosperity of the post war dream. The isolated hand holding the diamond to the right of the mural represents the dream that is out of reach.

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Type of Work: mural

Bio: Pat Perry

Pat Perry is an artist from Michigan who writes and makes pictures through careful and cautious observation. His subjects feature the clash of urban and natural life, with meticulous details strewn throughout each work. He works itinerantly, and currently lives in Detroit.

Inspiration: Edith Anisfield Wolf

We hope this mural is a message and reminder that we are not all apt to be so fearful of each other. That the ground we stand on was built to be a refuge. A reminder that divisiveness is a crack in the dam. When you shut them out, you shut yourselves in. Aggression and locked doors are what sow explosive seeds, and wars are always paid for with the blood of kids. This place was made to be a refuge. Our hollowed cities need people; bring them here.
If Edith Anisfield Wolf were alive today, I think she'd be encouraging us all to take direct aim at the great moral and social crises of our time. I can earnestly say that I think she'd be proud to see folks employing ideals taught to us by the past, in order to tackle issues of the present. That is the greatest gift history can give us.