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Anna Tararova

Type of Work: Mixed Media

Anna Tararova is a Russian-born artist based in Cleveland. She is a printmaker, photographer, and papermaker. Anna exhibits her work internationally and has completed artist residencies at Women’s Studio Workshop, The Center for Book and Paper Arts at Columbia College Chicago, The Morgan Conservatory, and Dundee Contemporary Arts. She is the Gallery and Artist Opportunities coordinator at the Morgan Art of Papermaking Conservatory and Educational Foundation in Cleveland.

I was attracted to the 'Stonewall Years' chapter of The Gay Revolution: The Story of the Struggle by Lillian Faderman. I would like to make a portrait of Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera. They were two trans women of color who took a big part in the Stonewall riots in 1969 and many other protests and rallies in 1970. They founded the Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries organization, which provided housing and social services to homeless queer youth and sex workers. It was a groundbreaking organization, since most other queer organizations at the time excluded drag queens and trans people. Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries was also behind organizing the first gay pride parade held on the anniversary of Stonewall riots. In The Gay Revolution, Lillian Faderman writes about the exclusion of trans people and people of color from the gay rights and women's right movements of the 60's and 70's. I believe the subject of intersectionality in social justice movements is still relevant today.
This exhibit is part of a temporary on-board installation.

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Amanda King

Type of Work: photography

For Conceptual Artist/Activist Amanda King, Art is even more than a means of expression, it is the vehicle through which she accomplishes community work. Her exhibitions explore themes of race, gender, socioeconomics, trauma, family and community. Through the lens of her camera, she tells the stories of often unseen communities and the societal forces that oppress them. King’s work weaves together elements of fine art photography, portraiture, and documentary photography to simultaneously bring awareness to the interconnectedness of her subjects’ struggles and to properly represent these individuals’ inner diversity. Amanda curates socially engaged
exhibitions and installations that pay homage to the environments in which those she photographs live. King works to sincerely capture the beauty and pain of her subjects’ surroundings, while at the same time educating audiences across communities.

In addition to creating art, Amanda has dedicated her career to advocating for adolescents and underrepresented communities. Amanda is Founder and Creative Director of Shooting Without Bullets, an expressive arts program that provides a framework for black and brown youth in Cleveland to develop and utilize their artistic voice to process the complex social issues affecting their lives & community.

Amanda received her B.A. in Art History from Bryn Mawr College (2011) and a J.D. from Case Western Reserve University School of Law (2017), where she focused on Race and Law, Constitutional Law, Juvenile Law, and the Philosophy of Law. She has been recognized by the Case Western Reserve University School of Law for using her public platform and creative talents to advocate for juvenile justice and police accountability. She is the recipient of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Award for following, in character and conduct, the spirit of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.; the Diane Ethics award for demonstrating exemplary understanding of the ethics and ideals of the legal profession in academic, professional and extracurricular activities; and the Dean’s Award for Community Service for her commitment to enriching the lives in the Greater Cleveland Area and serving as an example to others.

Title: “What’s Next?”
What is the next Great Migration? The elusive promised land that black Americans sought during the Great Migration, marched for during the Civil Rights Movement, and continue to protest for today doesn’t seem to exist anywhere-- not even in the arena of sports. This image pays homage to revolutionary protests by black athletes Jesse Owens, Tommie Smith, John Carlos and Colin Kaepernick.
Four boys sit on the steps of an abandoned school. In the background is the American Flag. Like Owens, one boy salutes the flag while two other boys raise their fists as did Tommie Smith and John Carlos. The fourth boy sits with his hands gently crossed, resting on his knees like Kaepernick.
The boys were born in Cleveland, the promised land fled to by Jesse Owens and his sharecropper parents during the Great Migration. Despite making the physical migration from South to North to escape lynching and other racial terrorism, black Americans are still nine times more likely to experience police brutality. Despite being the descendants of those who sought political asylum and greater opportunity in Ohio, they are not free from poverty and systemic barriers that hinder their upward mobility. Despite freedom of speech being a constitutional right, black Americans face personal and professional repercussions for speaking out against injustice.
Physical migration has not ensured safety for black Americans. Civil rights laws and constitutional protections have not ensured freedom from injustice. Even the economic success and notoriety that comes along with being a successful athlete cannot protect a black individual from racism. This image reminds us of protests of the past and asks us to imagine a better future. How do we create a Promised Land that is not just a dream of black migrants but a reality for black athletes, Clevelanders and black children like the ones depicted in this photo?
This exhibit is part of a temporary on-board installation.

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Adrienne Slane

Type of Work: Mixed Media

Adrienne Slane is an artist who works with collage. She graduated from The Cleveland Institute of Art in 2010 with a major in drawing. She currently lives in a rural town in Ohio and spends her days working in her studio, taking hikes in the forest, beachcombing, exploring abandoned places, and participating in the arts community. She creates hand-cut collages from old illustrations and antique and decorative papers. She combines images of plants, insects, animals, planets, human anatomy, and various objects whose diverse sources range from the 1500s to mid-1900s. The subject matter and composition of her work is inspired by the history of the curiosity cabinet, traditional women’s craft such as folk quilts and paper silhouettes, and Christian and Eastern iconography. Her work celebrates the beauty and interconnectivity of the universe in a time when our environment is in crisis. It draws its imagery from a wealth of illustrations that encouraged exploration, wonder, and appreciation of nature in decades past. It also honors a history of craft practiced by women who were largely denied the opportunity to seriously pursue the recognized fine arts. These women cut and gathered scraps of fabric and paper to create images that reflected their daily lives, their environment, and their folk histories. The decorative, ephemeral, and meditative qualities of old, Christian reliquaries and Eastern mandalas is also reflected in her work, where each individual element works to create a whole.

For my piece inspired by The Gay Revolution: The Story of Struggle by Lillian Faderman, and the theme of love, I have created a colorful, celebratory image using bold graphics. I have chosen to focus on the celebration of LGBT love that was/is made possible by longtime struggle to change negative societal opinions. For riders of public transportation, I think it is important to have imagery that is uplifting during their commute. Since the rainbow is one of the most iconic LGBT symbols, I have created my piece using the bold colors of the rainbow. Besides including the silhouettes of two men and two women representing gay couples and hands coming together representing support and unity, I have included hearts which symbolize love and the word “love” itself, since it is the theme. Birds and butterflies represent freedom in their ability to literally rise above. Butterflies also symbolize hope and positive transformation. The collection of flowers, stars, and various other shapes, besides adding additional beauty and interest to the piece, are meant to give the entire work the look of an exploding firework as in a significant celebration.
This exhibit is part of a temporary on-board installation.

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Sara Bicknell

Type of Work: Mixed Media

Sara Bicknell is an artist hailing from the swamps of Florida, and is currently based in Cleveland, OH. Although she works primarily in illustration, she occasionally dabbles in other forms of visual communication such as animation and design, and is a sucker for a good story.  Often employing whimsical and quirky characters, she hopes to illuminate thoughts that sometimes we’re afraid or embarrassed to share, and bring joy and relief into a world that sometimes get a little dark. Some of the things she draws inspiration from include overheard snippets of conversations, awkward interactions and feelings of unease, that tiny feeling you get in a large crowd, the stories behind objects we chose to keep or discard, people coming together for a common goal, and all the other nuances of being human.

 

In this piece, families begin a journey in an environment that appears impossible to navigate; however, over time they are able to move through it by changing their perspective, redirecting their expectations to find alternative routes, and with the help, acceptance, and support of others. Although some aspects of our identity are stable, much of it remains fluid, and is shaped by the experience the people we surround ourselves with. The journey taken by these families shapes their identity in ways that they could have not have conceived, and for many, it makes them more accepting, empathic, and adaptable. Andrew Solomon recalls how a Buddhist scholar explained that “nirvana occurs when you not only look forward to rapture, but also gaze back into the time of anguish and find in them seeds of your joy. This exhibit is part of a temporary on-board installation.

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Joel Quiggle

Type of Work: Mixed Media

Joel Quiggle offers an eclectic array, ranging from splashes of whimsy to more solemn commentaries bathed in symbolism. His vision is to inspire and encourage others; his passion is for the voiceless; and his mission is to use his talents for the glory of God. Quiggle earned his BFA in drawing/painting from Penn State University in 2007 and has exhibited at both Glass Growers Gallery and Urraro Gallery in his hometown of Erie, PA, as well as Octagon Gallery in Westfield, NY. He enjoys experimenting with mediums and often draws inspiration from apocalyptic texts and nameless, historical figures.

When creating this piece, I really wanted to show the forward/upward movement that is possible when you strive for something better. You have to put fear and doubt aside, and in this case, run towards the goal. During the Great Migration, many hopeful African Americans left behind pain and heartache in the South only to find more of the same in the North and West. However, James Cleveland Owens, who came to be known as Jesse Owens, was a shining star in the darkness. This inspirational black man went on to win four gold medals during the Berlin 1936 Olympics, ultimately bruising the pride of Hitler and his precious Aryan people.
This exhibit is part of a temporary on-board installation.